Other Coins in Circulation

EASTERN CARIBBEAN CENTRAL BANK
2002 COIN ISSUES

Five Cents
Diameter: 23.11 mm
Weight:1.74 gms
Alloy:Aluminium
Ten Cents
Diameter: 18.06 mm
Weight: 2.59 gms
Alloy: Cupro Nickel

 

In 2002 THE ONE CENT, TWO CENT, FIVE CENT AND ONE DOLLAR 
CHANGED SHAPES TO COMPLETE THE ROUND COIN FAMILY

Twenty Five Cents
Diameter: 23.98 mm
Weight: 6.48 gms
Alloy: Cupro Nickel
Common Obverse
New for the year 2002, the common obverse features Ian Rank-Broadley’s portrait of the Queen
One Dollar
Diameter: 26.50 mm
Weight: 7.98 gms
Alloy: Cupro Nickel

 

In 2002, the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank introduced several new round coins, to complete the Family of Round Coins.

All coins have a recent portrait of Queen Elizabeth II on one side, and either a design of crossed palm branches or a depiction of Sir Francis Drakes’ ship, the Golden Hind, on the other side. The edges are either smooth or ribbed.

The one-cent and ten-cent are similar in size, but it is still quite easy to distinguish between them, since the ten-cent is about two and a half times the weight of the one-cent. The one-cent has a smooth edge, and the number one, which is raised, can be felt in the centre between the cross palm design.

The ten-cent has a ribbed edge, and the number ten is on either side of the ship.

The five and twenty five-cent coins are about the same size, but the twenty-five cent piece is almost four times heavier than the five cent. The five-cent with its smooth edge, and the number raised between the cross palms, is different from the twenty-five cent piece with the ribbed edge, and the number on either side of the ship.

The features of the two-cent piece are similar to those of the one and five cent coins, but all three coins are different in weight and size.

The One Dollar is larger and heavier than the rest, with a distinctive edge of alternate smooth and ribbed sections.

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